Insights: A Lesson on Grit from Tiger Woods

2 min. read
  • The 11th volume of Life in the Sun, Sunway Group's official e-newsletter focuses on the value of grit
  • Grit is defined as the combination of passion and perseverance for a singularly important goal

“The return to glory!” said a commentator as Tiger Woods calmly slots in his final putt at the 18th hole of the Augusta National. A euphoric Woods, in his traditional red shirt, picks up his ball before raising both arms in joy.

Continue Reading

It was his first major championship win since 2008 and his 15th major overall. It could well be one of the greatest sporting comebacks of all time. At 43, it is fair to say that it was both a physical and psychological achievement. One that included overcoming personal and professional adversity of battling successive injuries, surgeries and scandals. Of course, many of which had been self-inflicted. But it doesn’t make it any less impactful. With the win, Woods’ ranking jumped to the 6th in the world, up 1,193 spots in the World Golf Rankings in little more than a year.

Woods’ triumph reminds us of human frailties and how little control we have over certain aspects of our lives. But his victory also reminds us of how strong the human mind is. His win was a testament to the amount of “grit” aka: mental toughness he has.

According to American psychologist Angela Duckworth, grit is defined as a “combination of passion and perseverance for a singularly important goal,” the commitment to finishing what you have started and the willingness and desire to survive harsh setbacks and unpleasant practices.

Even if you aren’t a huge fan of Woods, you got to give it to him, his win was one for the history books. It’s time we apply some grit to our work lives and personal lives so we, too, can achieve our desired goals no matter how difficult life is. As the saying goes: “when the going gets tough, the tough gets going.” The 11th issue of Life in the Sun, the official Sunway Group e-newsletter ,will focus on grit.

”Show Less”